Linda Christas

Education News

Facing Segregated Schools, Parents Took Integration Into Their Own Hands. It’s Working.

Published 04/16/2019 02:00 PM

Changes to middle school enrollment in parts of Brooklyn and Manhattan could force City Hall to take action on school segregation.

Students Receive ‘Target Letters’ in College Admissions Scandal, Lawyer Says

Published 04/16/2019 01:04 AM

At least some children of the parents who were charged in the college admissions scandal have reportedly received letters that notify people that they could be targets of a criminal probe.

Morehouse College, a Traditionally Black All-Male School, Says It Will Accept Transgender Men

Published 04/15/2019 05:00 AM

The policy, which was announced on Saturday, will continue to ban from enrollment women anyone who identifies as a woman.

Student Dies After Possible Hazing Episode at SUNY Buffalo

Published 04/17/2019 06:30 PM

The school suspended fraternity and sorority activities after Sebastian Serafin-Bazan, 18, went into cardiac arrest.

Cursive Seemed to Go the Way of Quills and Parchment. Now It’s Coming Back.

Published 04/13/2019 04:48 PM

Defenders of the writing style have lobbied to revive it in schools, igniting a debate about American values and exposing intergenerational fault lines.

Brigham Young Students Value Their Strict Honor Code. But Not the Harsh Punishments.

Published 04/12/2019 08:49 PM

The voices of young people with different views of social justice are pushing the Mormon Church to modernize.

LeBron James Opened a School That Was Considered an Experiment. It’s Showing Promise.

Published 04/13/2019 01:12 AM

The inaugural class of third and fourth graders at the school has posted extraordinary results on its first set of test scores.

A Few More Black Students Are Offered Spots at Stuyvesant, Fanning Fresh Uproar

Published 04/11/2019 07:38 PM

A once-obscure program named Discovery has become an unexpected flash point in a local debate about specialized school admissions and the national fight over affirmative action.

Can a Playroom Makeover Make My Kids Over?

Published 04/11/2019 04:08 PM

Simone Davies, a teacher and author, helped make over my kids’ playroom using Montessori educational principles like creating a sense of peace and instilling autonomy in children.

20 Years After Columbine, Schools Have Gotten Safer. But Fears Have Only Grown.

Published 04/20/2019 08:00 AM

The panic of mass shootings has ramped up efforts to secure schools. But anxieties remain high, even as federal data shows that schools are less violent.

Donald Stewart, 80, Dies; Took Over the College Board at a Crucial Time

Published 04/12/2019 11:21 PM

He favored high standards for college applicants and programs to help minority students meet those standards. Earlier he had helped revive Spelman College.

Lorraine Branham, Journalism Dean and Mentor, Dies at 66

Published 04/12/2019 04:09 AM

As the first woman and first person of color to lead the Newhouse School at Syracuse, she helped students and faculty embrace the future — and diversity.

Japan Is Among the Hardest Countries for Working Mothers. These Families Want to Change That.

Published 04/11/2019 03:21 PM

Men in Japan do fewer hours of domestic work than in any other wealthy nation. Mothers and fathers there told us how they’ve managed to buck the norm.

The American Curriculum: Is the U.S. a Democracy? A Social Studies Battle Turns on the Nation’s Values

Published 04/07/2019 10:00 AM

Michigan spent five years debating how to teach American history. One of the biggest questions was how to describe the nation’s government.

Harvard Is Investigating Fencing Coach for Sale of Home to Prospective Student’s Father

Published 04/05/2019 10:31 PM

The inquiry comes as universities around the country are embroiled in a sweeping admissions scandal.

TImes Insider: A Reporter Walks Into a Bar … and Meets a Jazz Musician Who Can Riff on Affirmative Action

Published 04/04/2019 08:37 PM

While researching a project on college admissions during the early years of affirmative action, I visited a bar called Paris Blues in Harlem. Turns out, I had come to the right place, and found the right person.

What’s Life Like as a Student at U.S.C.? Depends on the Size of the Bank Account

Published 04/03/2019 10:31 PM

As U.S.C. has fought to attract low-income students, the campus has become a vivid microcosm of the economic disparities in Los Angeles.

Humanities Endowment Announces New Grants Amid Old Threats

Published 04/02/2019 07:16 PM

The National Endowment for the Humanities announced grants supporting 233 projects around the country, two weeks after the latest effort to close the agency.

The Ethicist: Should My Daughter Speak Up About a Classmate’s Plagiarized Poem?

Published 04/02/2019 10:00 AM

The magazine’s Ethicist columnist on how to handle a cheating peer and whether to alert officials that a nanny is ill-treated.

Slave Owners’ Names Are on Dorms at a SUNY School. That’s Changing.

Published 04/02/2019 09:59 PM

Five dormitories and the dining hall at SUNY New Paltz in New York will feature Native American names instead of the town’s slave-owning founders.

College Road Trip: Indiana

Published 08/13/2010 07:50 PM

College Road Trip: California

Published 08/13/2010 07:40 PM

College Road Trip: Georgia

Published 08/13/2010 07:11 PM

Improving Instruction on Instruction in Education Grad Schools

Published 04/15/2010 05:00 AM

Few schools prepare teachers for life in the classroom, research shows.

The Business School Rankings Methodology

Published 04/15/2010 05:00 AM

How we rank graduate business schools

The New Doctors in the House

Published 04/15/2010 05:00 AM

How nurses are evolving into far bigger roles at hospitals.

The Science Rankings Methodology

Published 04/15/2010 05:00 AM

How we rank graduate programs in the sciences

Business School: Teaching More Than Work Ethic

Published 04/15/2010 05:00 AM

Tomorrow's corporate leaders are learning business skills and social values at B-schools.

Bitten by the Green Design Bug

Published 04/15/2010 05:00 AM

Engineering students flock to sustainable design, and schools aim for green waters.

Bringing Better Health to Rural America

Published 04/15/2010 05:00 AM

The nation's small towns need more physicians, and med schools aim to fill the gap.

Colleges Where Need for Aid Can Hurt Admission Odds

Published 03/23/2010 03:22 PM

See which schools are most likely to admit and you and give you financial aid.

Government Helps Low-Income Grad Students Pay for School

Published 04/22/2009 09:00 PM

Loans to be capped at 15 percent of income, and those entering public service may get loans forgiven.

Picking the Right School for an Education Grad Degree

Published 04/22/2009 09:00 PM

Is it more important to go to a great school or a school near where you want to teach?

Medical Schools Fight the War Against Disease

Published 04/22/2009 09:00 PM

Epidemiologists go straight to the source, then sift their data one clue at a time.

Business Schools Look for Different Kinds of Students

Published 04/22/2009 09:00 PM

Admissions offices are pursuing more women and minority candidates.

How Technology Is Changing the Medical Profession

Published 04/22/2009 09:00 PM

Clinical practice guidelines, electronic medical records, and population science are revolutionary.

Aerospace Engineering Searches for New Talent

Published 04/22/2009 09:00 PM

As more baby boomers reach retirement, demand for qualified graduates is on the rise.

America's Best Colleges: Most International Students

Published 03/17/2009 04:06 PM

The percent of undergraduates who are international.

America's Best Colleges: Freshman Retention Rates

Published 03/17/2009 04:01 PM

The average proportion of freshmen who return the following fall.

America's Best Colleges: Economic Diversity Among Top Schools

Published 03/17/2009 03:52 PM

Percentage of undergraduates receiving federal Pell grants at the Top 25 schools.

America's Best Colleges: Economic Diversity

Published 03/17/2009 03:44 PM

Percentage of undergraduates receiving federal Pell grants.

America's Best Colleges: Best Values

Published 03/17/2009 03:39 PM

These colleges give the best bang for your buck.

Cheaper, Bigger, and Cooler Student Loans

Published 07/01/2008 05:58 PM

New federal standards ease some of the financial pressure for students and their parents.

Colleges Drop Their Loan Programs

Published 04/17/2008 06:10 PM

Administrators at more than 250 public colleges have opted out of the Stafford loan program.

The Impact of the Virginia Tech Attack

Published 04/17/2008 05:59 PM

One consequence of the attack is the increased speed with which colleges respond to threats.

Cuts in European-Language Studies

Published 04/17/2008 05:43 PM

As more students study Arabic and Chinese, European-language departments are suffering cutbacks.

Hot Tips for a Graduate Degree in Education

Published 03/26/2008 04:01 PM

Smart Choices Special Ed. The number of teachers in this specialty is forecast to rise almost 15% by 2016. At some schools (e.g., Vanderbilt...

New Ways to Get a Degree in Education

Published 03/26/2008 04:01 PM

Options include salaried training, condensed course, and flexible schedules.

Hot Tips for Law School Students

Published 03/26/2008 04:01 PM

Specialization isn't the only way to gain practical know-how in law school.

Getting Business School Skills While in Law School

Published 03/26/2008 04:01 PM

Law school students can choose joint programs and special courses.

Changes for the GRE Exam This Fall

Published 09/12/2007 08:44 PM

The fill-in-the-blank questions get trickier, and some questions don't give any choices at all.

Playing Your Cards Right

Published 09/07/2007 05:44 PM

The stakes in the financial aid game are higher than ever.

Loans Are as Tricky as Ever

Published 09/07/2007 05:39 PM

Colleges break links with lenders but now give less guidance.

The New Rules of Finding Aid

Published 09/07/2007 05:28 PM

Codes of conduct and pending legislation are changing loan options for students and parents.

Nickel and Diming Your Kids to College

Published 09/07/2007 05:23 PM

Small rebates from retailers are just another way parents can fund ever expanding 529 plans.

Learning Economics 101

Published 09/07/2007 05:16 PM

Schools expect students to work part time. So do parents.

How to 'Leverage' Your Aid

Published 09/07/2007 05:03 PM

You can get more dough by pitting schools against one another.

SAT Scores Drop for the Second Year in a Row

Published 08/28/2007 04:41 PM

The College Board reports a gender gap in the writing section and a rise in students with disabilities.

3 Ways Education Freedom Scholarships Could Support Military Families

Published 04/18/2019 11:35 PM

April is “The Month of the Military Child,” and serves as a reminder that military children serve our country alongside their parents and face challenges that most other students don’t think about, let alone experience themselves. Each military child deserves the chance to flourish in an education environment that best leverages their unique learning style

Kentucky School District Awarded Additional Funds to Support Recovery Efforts Following Tragic School Shooting Last Year

Published 04/17/2019 08:39 PM

Benton, Kentucky – U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, alongside Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, announced today that Marshall County School District (MCSD) in Kentucky has been awarded a second Project School Emergency Response to Violence (SERV) grant totaling $460,064. This grant will assist MCSD in its continued recovery efforts following the Jan. 23, 2018, shooting that took the lives of two students and injured 14 others.

U.S. Education Secretary DeVos Touts Education Freedom Scholarships, Encourages Kentucky Leaders to Further Embrace School Choice at Roundtable Discussion

Published 04/17/2019 06:21 PM

Lexington, Kentucky—Today, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos joined Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin and Kentucky Education Commissioner Wayne Lewis for a conversation on education freedom and the importance of giving every student in Kentucky the opportunity to access the education option that works best for them.

5 Things to Know When Evaluating a Financial Aid Offer

Published 04/15/2019 10:10 PM

April is National Financial Capability Month and understanding the terms of your financial aid offer and making smart decisions about paying for college can be a good indicator of your financial capability. Many schools use the term “award letter” which can be misleading and make it sound like all the aid that is listed will Continue Reading

Prepared Remarks by Secretary DeVos at Butler Tech's Manufacturing Recognition & Signing Day

Published 04/12/2019 02:02 PM

Thank you, Jon Graft, for that kind introduction and for your hospitality. I enjoyed visiting with you in Washington and continue to be impressed with the ways Butler Tech is rethinking education—among them the new "Fifth Day Experience." And students, I'm so pleased to join you for "Signing Day!" What an exciting and fitting way to recognize what you've accomplished. What you're doing here today is as important and notable as any other signing day. You've made your families and all of us proud. And your achievements go far beyond a fancy diploma.

Answering your Frequently Asked Questions about Second Chance Pell

Published 04/11/2019 07:38 PM

This April, in recognition of Second Chance Month, we’re answering the most frequently asked questions about Second Chance Pell. What is Second Chance Pell? In 2016, the U.S. Department of Education created the Second Chance Pell (SCP) Experimental Sites Initiative to provide need-based Pell grants to those in state and federal prisons. This initiative examines

Readout of the First U.S. Department of Education State Education Leadership Conference

Published 04/10/2019 09:53 PM

U.S. Department of Education Delivers on Key School Safety Report Recommendation

Published 04/10/2019 01:56 PM

WASHINGTON — Acting on the recommendations of the Federal Commission on School Safety, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos today announced the release of the Parent and Educator Guide to School Climate Resources. This guide, produced jointly by the Department's Office of Elementary and Secondary Education and Office for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, provides best practices and includes resources school leaders and teachers can utilize as they work to achieve a positive school climate, lower disciplinary issues and enhance school safety.

Student Loan Forgiveness (and Other Ways the Government Can Help You Repay Your Loans)

Published 04/04/2019 11:00 PM

Here’s a question a lot of people may be wondering… Is it really possible to have my federal student loans forgiven or to get help repaying them? The answer is: Yes! However, there are very specific eligibility requirements for each situation in which you can apply for loan forgiveness or receive help with repayment. Loan forgiveness

Secretary DeVos Applauds Consensus on Higher Education Reforms

Published 04/03/2019 10:44 PM

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos welcomed news today that the committee debating her proposed “Accreditation and Innovation” higher education reforms reached consensus on the text of the draft rules. The package of higher education regulations is aimed at rethinking higher education to improve outcomes and accountability for students, institutions and taxpayers. The draft regulations, which will next be published for public comment, come after months of negotiated rulemaking that engaged a wide variety of higher education stakeholders.

Secretary DeVos Praises Tennessee's Work to Expand Education Freedom and Encourages Stakeholder Involvement During Education Roundtable

Published 04/01/2019 03:24 PM

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos joined Tennessee Governor Bill Lee in Nashville, Tennessee, today for a roundtable discussion on education freedom.

Secretary DeVos Corrects the Record on Trump Administration Support for Students with Disabilities

Published 03/27/2019 04:57 PM

Following is a statement from U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos: "It is unacceptable, shameful and counterproductive that the media and some members of Congress have spun up falsehoods and fully misrepresented the facts. "Make no mistake: we are focused every day on raising expectations and improving outcomes for infants and toddlers, children and youth with disabilities, and are committed to confronting and addressing anything that stands in the way of their success.

Prepared Remarks by Secretary DeVos to the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies

Published 03/26/2019 04:01 PM

Chairwoman DeLauro, Ranking Member Cole, and Members of the Subcommittee:Thank you for the opportunity to testify on the President’s fiscal year 2020 budget.

Secretary DeVos Issues Statement on President Trump's Higher Education Executive Order

Published 03/21/2019 08:24 PM

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos released the following statement today on President Trump's Executive Order on "Improving Free Inquiry, Transparency, and Accountability at Colleges and Universities":

Secretary DeVos Issues Statement on Higher Education Act Reform Principles Introduced During National Council for the American Worker Meeting

Published 03/18/2019 08:51 PM

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos released the following statement on the Administration's Higher Education Act reform principles released during today's meeting of the National Council for the American Worker:

Congress Considers Making College More Accessible To People In Prison

Published 04/20/2019 03:00 PM

A bipartisan group of lawmakers across the House and the Senate introduced a bill that would allow people in prison access to federal Pell grants to pay for college.

When A Mexican American Student Group Voted To Change Its Name Controversy Ensued

Published 04/19/2019 09:23 PM

A decision to change the name of a historic student group has sparked a debate about Mexican-American identity and the future of the Chicano movement.

Virgin Island Schools Are Still Facing Challenges From Hurricanes Irma And Michael

Published 04/19/2019 09:23 PM

Nearly a year and a half after Hurricanes Irma and Michael, schools in the Virgin Islands still face big challenges with larger class sizes and limited extracurricular activities.

How Trump's Judicial Nominees Have Handled Questions On Brown v. Board Of Education

Published 04/19/2019 09:23 PM

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Dahlia Lithwick, legal analyst for Slate, about how President Trump's judicial nominees have responded to questions about Brown v. Board of Education.

UNC Basketball Coach Sylvia Hatchell Resigns After Investigation

Published 04/19/2019 08:41 PM

An 18-day probe into the women's basketball program found the Hall of Fame coach is not racist but did make "racially insensitive" remarks. She also pressured players to play through serious injuries.

How Effective Are School Lockdown Drills?

Published 04/19/2019 07:08 PM

Since the 1999 Columbine High School shooting, a generation of American children has learned how to hide from a potential shooter. But there's little data on what kinds of drills work best.

Twenty Years Later, A Look At Columbine, Then And Now

Published 04/18/2019 03:06 PM

We explore what's changed and what has stayed the same about gun violence in schools over the past two decades.

Indiana Teachers Stage Protests To Spotlight Low Wages

Published 04/17/2019 10:01 AM

Teachers have been protesting for higher wages. In Indiana, lawmakers introduced measures to improve the situation but many teachers say it may not be enough to keep them in the profession.

A Rare Sight At Brigham Young University As Students Protest The Honor Code Office

Published 04/16/2019 09:49 PM

Students allege that the university is mistreating victims of sexual assault and harassment, especially women and LGBTQ students.

Lori Loughlin, Mossimo Giannulli Plead Not Guilty In College Cheating Scandal

Published 04/15/2019 09:52 PM

Giannulli and Loughlin are accused of paying $500,000 in bribes arranged by admissions consultant Rick Singer to get their daughters admitted to USC as crew recruits, despite not being rowers.

Arizona Teachers Can Now Discuss LGBTQ Issues Without Worrying About The Law

Published 04/15/2019 07:30 PM

Lawmakers in Arizona have repealed a law that banned teachers from portraying "homosexuality as a positive alternative life-style" during HIV/AIDS instruction.

Georgetown Students Vote To Fund Reparations For School's Slavery Connections

Published 04/13/2019 01:16 PM

Georgetown University students voted to set up a fund to pay reparations to the descendants of slaves sold by the school. NPR's Scott Simon talks with Hannah Michael, who helped organize the effort.

How One Mother's Battle Is Changing Police Training On Disabilities

Published 04/13/2019 10:00 AM

Patti Saylor's son, Ethan, died after an encounter with law enforcement when he was 26. She believes the incident could have been prevented with better training.

A Dystopian High School Musical Foresaw The College Admissions Scandal

Published 04/12/2019 10:11 AM

A California high school is staging an original musical called Ranked, set in a world where class rank means everything, and some parents are willing to pay for their student to get a better spot.

How To Calculate The Cost Of College: A Guide To Financial Aid Terms

Published 04/11/2019 06:00 PM

For most students, figuring out where to go to college is closely linked with, "How am I gonna pay for it?" The answer — sort of — comes in lots of confusing terms and jargon.

Pompeo says US will take 'tough action' on Russian meddling

Published 04/19/2019 04:35 PM

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo vowed Friday the United States would keep taking "tough action" on Russia after Special Counsel Robert Mueller revealed widespread attempts by Moscow to help elect President Donald Trump. A day after Mueller's 400-page report was released publicly, Pompeo said that the Trump administration had raised interference in the 2016 election during each meeting with Russia.

Northern Irish Police: Journalist’s Murder Sign Of A ‘New Brand Of Terrorism’

Published 04/20/2019 10:38 PM

Northern Irish police said a “new brand of terrorism” was responsible for the death of a well-respected journalist who was killed last week as they announced the arrest of two teenagers in connection with the killing.Twenty-nine year-old journalist and LGBT activist Lyra McKee was fatally shot on Thursday while covering a clash between police and nationalist rioters in Londonerry. She was standing near police officers when rioters fired gunshots and threw petrol bombs at police. During a press conference on Saturday, police in Northern Ireland announced that arrested two men, 18 and 19 years old, under the country’s terrorism act in connection with McKee’s murder. They have been taken thw two to Musgrave Serious Crime Suite for questioning.On Friday, police blamed McKee’s murder on gunshot wounds fired indiscriminately, and released footage of a masked gunman firing during the riots. “What we are seeing is a new breed of terrorist coming through the ranks and that for me is a very worrying situation,” Police Service of Northern Ireland Superintendent Jason Murphy said.Violence has flared in Northern Ireland over the past several months as the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union has once again raised questions about the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland’s borders. Law enforcement on Friday blamed the killing on members of the New Irish Republican Army. The small group rejects the 1998 Good Friday peace agreement, which put an end to the unrest of the period dubbed the Troubles and years of sectarian civil war between Irish nationalists and UK loyalists. According to the Associated Press, the group has also been blamed for a car bombing in Londonderry earlier this year, as well as several killings over the past several years. The group also claimed it sent mail bombs across the UK.McKee, an independent journalist whose work covering the conflict in Northern Ireland once earned her a spot on the Forbes 30 under 30 list, was just weeks away from publishing her first book about young people who disappeared during the Troubles.Her death sparked an outpouring of grief from journalists and many local and international political figures. “This cannot stand,” her partner Sara Canning said during a vigil on Friday. “Lyra’s death must not be in vain because her life was a shining light in everyone else’s life, and her legacy will live on in the light that she’s left behind.”Read more at The Daily Beast.

The Latest: Crown of Thorns presented at Paris service

Published 04/19/2019 10:41 PM

PARIS (AP) — The Latest on the fire that ravaged Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris (all times local):

Three mountaineers presumed dead in Canada avalanche

Published 04/19/2019 04:09 PM

Three world-renowned professional mountaineers -- two Austrians and an American -- were missing and presumed dead after an avalanche on a western Canadian summit, the country's national parks agency said Thursday. American Jess Roskelley, 36, and Austrians Hansjorg Auer, 35, and David Lama, 28, went missing Tuesday evening in Banff National Park, according to media reports.

UPDATE 1-Doves, heartbreak and hope on 20th anniversary of Columbine High massacre

Published 04/21/2019 12:55 AM

Addressing hundreds of people gathered at Saturday's service in a park next to the school, Dawn Anna, mother of slain student Lauren Townsend, spoke on behalf of all the families of the victims about their sense of loss. Patrick Ireland, whose fall out of a school library window into the arms of firefighters, which became one of the iconic images of the massacre, spoke of his long physical and emotional recovery. Betty Shoels, the aunt of murdered student Isaiah Shoels, said her 18-year-old nephew was a fun-loving athlete who was always smiling, despite feeling out of place as one of the school's few African-American students.

The Quick Read About… Ukraine’s Run-Off Presidential Elections

Published 04/19/2019 09:00 PM

Here's what you need to know about the Ukrainian presidential election run-off between insider candidate and a popular comedian.

Hundreds hurt as blasts hit Sri Lanka churches, hotels

Published 04/21/2019 06:30 AM

A string of blasts hit high-end hotels and churches in Sri Lanka on Sunday, injuring hundreds of people as worshippers attended Easter services. The first explosions were reported at St Anthony's Church in Colombo and St Sebastian's in the town of Negombo just outside the capital. At least 160 people injured in the St Anthony's blast had been admitted to the Colombo National Hospital by mid-morning, an official told AFP.

The Army Passed on This Glock Gun (And It Could Be Your Gain)

Published 04/20/2019 09:00 AM

The ultimate Glock? The Army may have chosen Sig Sauer’s P320 for its Modular Handgun System program over Glock’s offerings, but that doesn’t mean you have to: Glock plans on releasing a civilian variant of its 9mm Glock 19 pistol to civilian buyers this month, the company announced today.(This article by Jared Keller originally appeared at Task & Purpose. Follow Task & Purpose on Twitter. This article first appeared in 2018.)Glock’s commercial pistol, dubbed the 19X, is the company’s first stab at a crossover model, combining the Glock 17 frame with a Glock 19 barrel. With a “marksman barrel” and ambidextrous slide-stop levers, the pistol is designed to be as versatile as it is powerful, “almost like a [1911] Commander-style situation where you’ve got the shorter barrel with the full-sized grip frame,” as national sales manager Bob Radecki told Army Times on Jan. 2.The new 9mm Glock 19X from Glock

Meghan McCain goes after anti-vaxxers, slams their 'stupidity' for endangering children

Published 04/20/2019 07:48 PM

Meghan McCain isn't mincing words when it comes to her take on anti-vaxxers, taking to Twitter Friday to send a message about their "stupidity."

8 Things We Learned Driving the Roush Ford F-150 SC, a Pickup Truck on Steroids

Published 04/19/2019 01:00 PM

Sarah Sanders reiterates Comey claims despite admitting to lying

Published 04/19/2019 03:23 PM

Press secretary defended past statements she made in an interview on Friday that Mueller’s team said had ‘no basis in fact’Follow the latest on the Mueller report – liveSupport the Guardian’s independent journalism and make a contribution Sarah Sanders departs after speaking to reporters at the White House in Washington DC, on 2 April. Photograph: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters Sarah Sanders, the White House press secretary, has defended claims she repeatedly made to reporters in 2017 regarding Donald Trump’s firing of then FBI director James Comey – despite admitting to investigators for the special counsel Robert Mueller that they had no basis in fact. Sanders admitted in statements to the special counsel that her repeated claims that the president fired Comey because the rank-and-file of the FBI had lost confidence in him as FBI director were “a slip of the tongue” and “not founded on anything”, according to the redacted version of the Mueller report released on Thursday. The long-awaited report – the product of a two-year investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 US election and the Trump campaign – exposed a culture of lying at the White House. The report included multiple examples of Trump’s current and former press secretaries making false claims to journalists, particularly in the days after Comey’s firing. Sanders told the special counsel’s office that a statement she made to journalists about how the White House had heard from “countless members” of the FBI that Comey lacked support within the agency, “was not founded on anything”. Yet on Friday, Sanders appeared on ABC’s Good Morning America and appeared to stand by the statement she had admitted was a lie. Asked by TV host George Stephanopoulos about her “deliberate false statement” she said: “They [FBI rank-and-file] continued to speak out and said that James Comey was a disgrace, a leaker. I stand by the fact, George.” Stephanopoulos, a former White House communications director under Bill Clinton, interrupted, saying: “[You admitted] those comments weren’t founded on anything, when you faced criminal penalty.” On @GMA, White House press sec. Sarah Sanders sought to double down on past statements she made that special counsel Robert Mueller's team said were "not founded on anything." Watch the full interview: https://t.co/7mRpysmjN1 pic.twitter.com/wrHqaXgyp7— ABC News (@ABC) April 19, 2019 Sanders answered: “It was the heat of the moment, meaning that it wasn’t a scripted talking point. I’m sorry that I wasn’t a robot like the Democratic party.” Sanders’ claim on 10 May 2017, the day after Comey was fired, that “countless members of the FBI” opposed Comey was “a slip of the tongue”, Sanders told the special counsel’s office in an interview last year. Sanders repeated that “slip of the tongue” during a press briefing the following day, when skeptical White House reporters questioned her on her claim that Comey did not have support within the FBI’s rank-and-file. One reporter asked what basis the White House had for that conclusion, given that the FBI’s acting director had publicly said that Comey still had the support among the FBI’s agents. “I can speak to my own personal experience,” Sanders told the White House press. “I’ve heard from countless members of the FBI that are grateful and thankful for the president’s decision.” She went on: “I’ve certainly heard from a large number of individuals. And that’s just myself. And I don’t know that many people in the FBI.” “You personally have talked to countless officials, employees, since this happened?” another reporter asked later. “Correct,” Sanders said. “I mean, really?” the second reporter asked. “Between, like, email, text messages – absolutely,” Sanders said. “Fifty? Sixty? Seventy?” the reporter asked. “Look, we’re not going to get into a numbers game. I have heard from a large number of individuals that work at the FBI that said they’re very happy with the president’s decision. I don’t know what else I can say.” A year later, in interviews with the special counsel’s office, Sanders said “that her statement in a separate press interview that rank-and-file FBI agents had lost confidence in Comey was a comment she made ‘in the heat of the moment’ that was not founded on anything”. Sean Spicer, the White House press secretary at the time, also made a false claim to reporters about Comey’s firing, telling journalists the night Comey was fired that the decision to fire him “was all” Rod Rosenstein, the deputy attorney general. Rosenstein said in an interview with the special counsel’s office that he had told other justice department officials that night that he would not participate in putting out a “false story” that Comey’s firing had been his idea. Sanders replaced Spicer as White House press secretary in July 2017. The White House’s public press briefings to journalists have become increasingly rare and increasingly brief, another issue of concern for the American press and White House transparency.

NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what didn't happen this week

Published 04/19/2019 09:11 PM

A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week. None of these is legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked these out. Here are the real facts:

Children of California 'house of horrors' parents beg judge for more lenient sentence

Published 04/19/2019 07:56 PM

The children of a California couple sentenced to life in prison for torturing them in a case that has shocked the US said they "forgive" their parents as they begged the judge for a more lenient sentence.  David and Louise Turpin's 13 children were discovered malnourished, shackled to their beds and living in filthy conditions when their 17-year-old daughter escaped the home and raised the alarm last January. "I love both of my parents so much," said one of the daughters, in a statement read by her brother at a sentencing hearing on Friday. The comments were echoed by some of the other children, with one asking for a lighter sentence because "they believed everything they did was to protect us". The couple, who pleaded guilty to 14 charges including child abuse and torture in February, have been sentenced to life in prison with the possibility of parole in 25 years. Investigators said all but one of the children - the baby - was abused Credit: UPI / Barcroft Images  The California "house of horrors" case, as it came to be known, shocked the US after the scale of the abuse was laid bare last year. When police entered the property in Perris, California they said it was covered in filth and the stench of human waste was overwhelming. The Turpins' offspring, who ranged from 2 - 29 years old at the time, were so severely malnourished they required urgent treatment for severe muscle wastage and neurological conditions. At least two girls have been left unable to bear children.  The deeply religious couple told the court they believed God had called on them to have so many children. Louise Turpin, left, listens to her attorney, Jeff Moore, during a sentencing hearing Friday Credit: AP Mrs Turpin, 50, wept as the first public statements from some of the children, who alternately spoke of love for their parents and what they had suffered. None of the children were publicly identified. One of the girls pleaded for a lenient sentence, saying her parents believed "God put it into their hearts" to home school the 13 children but were unable to cope.  Another said: "Life may have been bad but it made me strong. I fought to become the person that I am. I saw my dad change my mom. They almost changed me, but I realised what was happening. ... I'm a fighter, I'm strong and I'm shooting through life like a rocket." David Turpin, left, listens to his attorney during a sentencing hearing Friday Credit: AP Ahead of his sentence, Mr Turpin, 57, told the judge he never intended to harm his children, saying: "My homeschooling and discipline had good intentions".  "I'm sorry for everything I've done to hurt my children. I love my children so much," Ms Turpin said. Judge Bernard Schwartz told the couple they had delayed their children's "emotional, mental and physical development" as he jailed them on Friday. "You have severed the ability to interact and raise the children that you created and brought into this world," he said.   The court had previously heard how the children were only allowed to shower once a year and were mainly kept in their rooms except for meals, which had been reduced from three to one per day.  Other than an occasional family trip to Las Vegas or Disneyland, they rarely left the home. They slept during the day and were active a few hours at night. Although the couple filed paperwork with the state to home school their children, learning was limited.  "We don't really do school. I haven't finished first grade," the 17-year-old said, according to Deputy Manuel Campos. Investigators found that the toddler had not been abused, but all of the children were hospitalised after they were discovered. The seven adult children were living together and attending university in February when their parents pleaded guilty.

Solemn service to mark 20th anniversary of Columbine High massacre

Published 04/20/2019 11:00 AM

A week-long series of events commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Columbine High School massacre culminates on Saturday with a remembrance ceremony celebrating the lives of the 13 victims slain in the rampage. Betty Shoels, the aunt of murdered student Isaiah Shoels, said her 18-year-old nephew was a fun-loving athlete who was always smiling, despite feeling out of place as one of the school's few African-American students. Evan Todd was a sophomore at Columbine two decades ago when he was wounded in the school library, where 10 of the students were killed.

Assad urges progress on Idlib deal ahead of Syria talks

Published 04/19/2019 11:31 PM

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad on Friday called for progress on a stalled buffer zone deal around jihadist-dominated Idlib region ahead of fresh talks aimed at ending his country's eight-year war. Assad met envoy Alexander Lavrentiev from key ally Russia in Damascus to discuss the negotiations due April 25-26 in Kazakhstan. Iran and Russia are the major supporters of the Syrian regime, and along with rebel backer Turkey have sponsored repeated rounds of talks in the Central Asian nation.

Officials: South Carolina school girl died of natural causes

Published 04/19/2019 11:45 PM

WALTERBORO, S.C. (AP) — South Carolina authorities said Friday that the death of a fifth grade girl at school last month was due to natural causes and not a fight with another student, which they described as lasting only seconds. But the family of the girl disagreed, saying she was repeatedly antagonized by the other student.

Take a Look at the SW1911 Gun: Smith & Wesson’s Very Own 1911 Pistol

Published 04/20/2019 10:37 AM

One of the oldest gun companies in America produces its own take on one of the most exemplary handgun designs in U.S. history.Smith & Wesson’s series of handguns based on the 1911 platform stays true to the gun’s roots while adding in a number of features desirable to modern firearms enthusiasts. The company produces a full line of 1911s, from traditional to contemporary, catering to collectors and duty carriers, in a full range of sizes.The 1911 pistol was invented by prolific small arms designer John Moses Browning in the early twentieth century. Browning paired the pistol with his new .45 Automatic Colt Pistol cartridge, a large, heavy subsonic cartridge that delivered upwards of 400 foot-pounds of energy on target. The pairing of a semi-automatic pistol capable of holding eight rounds with the .45 ACP manstopper round was in response to reports that U.S.-issue revolvers in .38 Long Colt often failed to stop Filipino insurgents in close quarters combat.Although the 1911 missed the Philippine Insurrection, it was well positioned to enter World War I on the side of the U.S. military. The American Expeditionary Force issued the 1911 in large numbers where they fought in the trenches of World War I. Minor changes in the design resulted in the 1911A1 designation during the 1920s. More than a million pistols were produced for U.S. and allied forces during World War II, enough that the armed services kept the 1911 in frontline service well into the 1980s.

Israel destroys family apartments of Palestinian accused of murderer

Published 04/19/2019 06:54 PM

Israeli forces destroyed two apartments in the occupied West Bank on Friday that housed the family of a Palestinian accused of killing an Israeli woman in February, the army said.

Spy game? Can China's Huawei be trusted with our 5G?

Published 04/19/2019 08:10 PM

Depending on whom you believe, Huawei is either a key provider of cellular equipment in the transition to 5G, or a Chinese agent of espionage

Ilhan Omar: Somali Americans vow to stand up to Trump attacks

Published 04/21/2019 06:00 AM

After being accused of endangering one of the city’s US representatives, the president visited Minneapolis. Activists were there to meet himProtesters support Minnesota representative Ilhan Omar, outside an event attended by Donald Trump this week. Photograph: Kerem Yucel/AFP/Getty ImagesAs she stood in a crowd of protesters, helping hold a long “Stand with Ilhan” sign outside the trucking company in Burnsville where Donald Trump was about to speak, Habon Abdulle could not help but be swept up in the contradictory emotions of the moment.As a hijab-wearing Muslim woman who speaks with a slight Somali accent, and as executive director of Women Organizing Women (Wow) Network, a not-for-profit group dedicated to training and supporting East African immigrants who run for office, Abdulle had more than a passing familiarity with the some of the views reflected in signs and chants among a crowd of Trump supporters lined up across the street.There was the idea that Muslims were as a whole responsible for 9/11, and that the congresswoman Ilhan Omar and her supporters were affiliated with terrorist groups. There was another oldie-but-goodie: that the city of Minneapolis, like many urban centers dealing with an affordable housing shortage driven by an influx of new residents, is filled with crime-ridden “no go” zones governed by sharia law, where police supposedly fear to tread.> We thought we passed the collective blaming, the ‘punish the whole for the actions of a few'> > Habon AbdulleAbdulle was still a little surprised to see such arguments expressed so brazenly, out in the open, just as she had been a few days earlier when Trump retweeted a video meant to show Omar did not respect the tragedy of 9/11.“There are conversations in my community,” Abdulle told the Guardian. “We thought we passed the collective blaming, the ‘punish the whole for the actions of a few’. Those were things that we experienced right after the 9/11 attack. And many of us actually thought we were done with that. But lately, it actually feels that it’s back. It’s really weird, like: what’s going on?”> On the pro-Ilhan side of the protests, two Muslim women, @nausheena and Asma Mohammed of @RISEsisterhood led many of the chants. > > Here, @HabonDaud explains why she thought it was important that Muslim women stand in the front. pic.twitter.com/83keO83kFU> > — Jared Goyette (@JaredGoyette) April 20, 2019She also saw reasons for optimism. A young Muslim woman walked in front of the pro-Omar group, wearing a black hijab and a keffiyeh scarf, holding a bullhorn and leading a chant. Abdulle watched as the crowd responded, many white and older Minnesotans included. That, she thought, was something she could work with.“If we don’t stand up for ourselves,” she asked, “who will? We have to stand up for ourselves and they felt someone who looks like them was attacked. And we were all of us out there saying, ‘No.’ We are not going to accept. We have rights. It isn’t fair that someone always has to other us. So, we went there because that was the right place to be that day.”In the same moment, from the other side of the street, a tall man with a gray scraggly beard could be overheard cracking a joke.“Hey, is that Omar? They all look the same to me.”He might have been on to something, but not in the way he intended. The young Muslim women in the crowd did see themselves in Omar. That was why they were out in force.> I came here to support my sister Ilhan. She’s been under attack and she’s been facing death threats> > Ama Mohammed“I came here to support my sister Ilhan,” the keffiyeh-wearing woman, Asma Mohammed, 26, told the Guardian. “She’s been under attack and she’s been facing death threats consistently, but even more so after Trump tweeted things about her that make her seem like she was sympathizing with terrorists.”Mohammed said Omar was more than just a political figure: “She is my sister, as Minnesotans; she is my sister as another woman of faith; as another woman who wears a hijab and faces that kind of hate on the daily.”Such a mix of outrage, disappointment and incredulousness, along with a growing sense of empowerment, was common among activists the Guardian spoke to in Minneapolis in the week after Trump’s tweet.Omar’s office was quieter than usual, declining media requests and not issuing statements, leaving Trump to deal with the fallout from the Mueller report without his favorite new foil to spar with.But if there is one thing Trump has been consistent about in his political career, it has been the targeting of migrants and Muslims in moves meant to appeal to his base. Many observers believe he will redouble such efforts as 2020 draws near.> She’s anti-American. She’s anti-Jews …Everyone knew the Muslims took down those buildings in New York> > Melody BlackOmar and Trump have become intrinsically linked, and not just on Trump’s terms. Omar was elected to the House of Representatives in November as part of an anti-Trump blue wave that included Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan. Before that, she made national news when she became the first Somali American in statewide office, on the night Trump was elected president. Her victory party at a Marriott in downtown Minneapolis was a rollercoaster, tears and dancing underscored by a sense of girding for a fight.“It’s going to be very tough,” Omar said then. “We have to figure out how to organize the community to prepare for what’s to come. We have to amplify our voices of love against the rhetoric of hate.”That fight has now come, though in a more direct way than many supporters thought possible. As Trump uses Omar to galvanize his base, he will inevitably rally hers. Last Monday’s rival protests outside Trump’s Tax Day event signalled such battles to come.> In this clip, @nausheena and Asma Mohammed of @RISEsisterhood explain why they came to the standwithilhan protest in Burnsville on Monday. pic.twitter.com/XQFVu8sxkz> > — Jared Goyette (@JaredGoyette) April 20, 2019“Omar really needs to go,” said Melody Black, a Trump supporter from Red Wing, Minnesota, as a man behind her held a “Making America Great Again” sign.“She’s anti-American. She’s anti-Jews. She’s anti-Minnesotan. And everyone knew that the Muslims took down those buildings in New York. All of us watched it. And now they’re saying that we’re racist because we say it. But it’s the truth.“Omar came from Somalia and her father taught her exactly how to do what she’s doing – including getting into government. They’re trying to take over our government, the Muslims are.”Trump supporters hoist a flag and give the thumbs-up. Photograph: Kerem Yucel/AFP/Getty ImagesOmar has indeed inspired other Muslim women to enter politics.“Many women within the Somali community who never thought to run for office changed their mind,” Abdulle said. The Minnesota state house now has its second female Somali American legislator, Hodan Hassan.Across the street from Black, Nausheena Hussain, a 42-year-old in a dark purple headscarf who directs a female-led Muslim not-for-profit organization, took her turn leading a round of chants. She said Trump’s attacks on Omar had encouraged others.“What I’m hearing, specially my community, is that she cannot be alone,” Hussain said. “They are asking everybody to run for office that has those same progressive values, so she is not bearing the brunt of the responsibility by herself.“And so I feel like 2020, you are going to see more people of color running for office, more Muslims or Muslim women, because not only do we not want her to be the only one there, but we have seen that she’s able to fight and still get things done. More people need to back her up and to be part of that.”Abdulle welcomed such words.“That’s how we are going to end the polarization,” she said. “That’s how we’re going to end the hatred. That’s how we’re going to end the narrative that we are not American.“I’m going to repeat the whole day long: we are American.”

Converse introduces trans-themed shoes for Pride and Twitter is happy for once

Published 04/20/2019 03:19 PM

Brands sometimes go too hard during Pride season. Every once in a while, however, they get it right.The year 2019 has already brought us one *actually good* example. Converse recently introduced its LGBTQ Pride sneaker line, which now includes sneakers modeled after the Transgender Pride flag.This is the first time Converse has ever had a trans-specific sneaker.SEE ALSO: Mapping state-by-state tech trends: Most popular dating appsThe trans-specific sneakers currently retail for $80. Customers can also customize their own rainbow Pride shoes and add Trans Pride flair.Regardless of how you feel about corporate participation during gay Pride, this is a huge symbolic step forward. Advocates for the trans community have long complained that gay and lesbian people dominate the LGBTQ movement. Recognizing the trans community as a separate -- though equally sneaker-worthy community -- is emblematic of a larger cultural shift. Trans people are clearly moving into the public spotlight, and they can show that (if Converse is their thing) on their feet.Twitter was largely enthusiastic about the move.> TransIsBeautiful > Thank you @Converse for making a trans PRIDE shoe this year! > My 11 year-old-son is ECSTATIC! ️‍ pic.twitter.com/E6lcqIEvfA> > -- Rachel Q. Lyons (@RachelQLyons) April 15, 2019> CONVERSE HAS A NEW PRIDE COLLECTION THAT INCLUDES TRANS PRIDE SNEAKERS FOR THE FIRST TIME!!!!!!!! > > SHOP HERE: https://t.co/afn0Gc9nwy (affiliate link) pic.twitter.com/TptVcjY87E> > -- Alysse Dalessandro (@readytostare) April 19, 2019> I thought "which of my trans friends would rock Converse decked out in the colors of the trans flag," and then immediately realized the answer was "all of them." pic.twitter.com/E5NPDfPgMY> > -- Aram Vartian (@vartian) April 19, 2019> Me, looking at the chuck taylor pride collection for this year: *not super impressed* > Converse: we have trans shoes now > Me, out loud: DAMMIT pic.twitter.com/oqzpDUqaOD> > -- Rowan Adventurezone (@politebotanist) April 20, 2019> Y'all let me know when @converse lets me put trans flags on these (and they come in my size). pic.twitter.com/3ZOq9Y6rss> > -- Xan (@AlexandriaDVine) April 20, 2019> Look! You can make them with the pride base but then add trans pride touches. I'm in love! pic.twitter.com/bGtajM2QjF> > -- We'll Have A Gay Old Time (@IssaMeBrianO) April 19, 2019This Twitter user perhaps said it best.> Fuckin converse put the Trans flag on some shoes like.....yes fine I will buy them you stupid brand, ill bow to capitalism just this once> > -- Thank you gay dad (@Darius_lives) April 19, 2019Happy incredibly early Pride, everyone! WATCH: Meet the 10-year-old drag kid shaping the future of drag youth

Here Are All of the 2020 Hyundai Sonata's Available Colors—Including Yellow

Published 04/20/2019 02:30 PM

Coloradans mark 20th anniversary of a dark day: Columbine shooting

Published 04/20/2019 05:29 PM

It has been 20 years since two heavily armed young men in dark trenchcoats entered a Colorado high school and launched a bloody attack that seared the word "Columbine" into the American psyche, forever transforming the debate on gun rights and school violence. As people on Saturday prepared to mark the anniversary of the massacre in Littleton, Colorado -- in which teenaged shooters Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris killed 12 Columbine High School students and a teacher before turning their guns on themselves -- there were words of grief and loss and anger. School shootings, once almost unheard of, have become a tragic feature of American life -- requiring all schools to tighten security, forcing even six-year-olds to take part in traumatic "live-shooter" drills.

Four Turkish soldiers killed in clashes with PKK - ministry

Published 04/20/2019 09:46 AM

Four Turkish soldiers were killed on Friday in clashes with the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) near the border with Iraq, Turkey's Defence Ministry said on Saturday. Demiroren News Agency said a military base had been attacked in the mountainous Cukurca district of Turkey's southeastern province of Hakkari, prompting the Turkish military to respond with a "large-scale" military operation. "As part of ongoing operations in the Turkey-Iraq border, two soldiers were killed in clashes with terrorists despite all efforts to save them," the ministry said, adding a total of four soldiers were killed and six wounded.

Relatives of German bus crash victims arrive in Madeira

Published 04/19/2019 04:16 PM

FUNCHAL, Portugal (AP) — Relatives of some of the 29 German tourists who died in a bus crash in Madeira arrived on the Portuguese island on Friday as investigators pushed on with the task of finding out why the bus veered off the road and plunged down a slope.

Vulnerable House Democrats tread carefully in wake of Mueller report

Published 04/20/2019 01:37 PM

The party's chances of keeping control of the U.S. House of Representatives likely hinge its ability to defend those seats. In the report released on Thursday, Special Counsel Robert Mueller said Trump may have obstructed justice and portrayed a president bent on stopping the probe into Russian meddling.

Aircraft Carrier Alliance: Will Britain Build India a New Queen Elizabeth-Class Carrier?

Published 04/19/2019 01:24 PM

Will India’s next aircraft carrier be a British design?British defense contractor BAE Systems is offering a Queen Elizabeth-class design as a contender for India’s third aircraft carrier, which will be built in India.“BAE Systems has begun discussions with India regarding the potential for basing development of the second Indigenous Aircraft Carrier (IAC-2) project on the successful Queen Elizabeth Class design,” said a BAE statement. “The design is adaptable to offer either ski jump or catapult launch and can be modified to meet Indian Navy and local industry requirements.”India currently operates one aircraft carrier, the 45,000-ton Vikramaditya, which is actually the former Soviet carrier Admiral Gorshkov. That ship has been plagued by engine problems as well as reliability issues with its MiG-29K fighters.Under construction is India’s first indigenous carrier, the 40,000-ton Vikrant, while is scheduled to go to sea in 2020. But as is often the case with Indian-built defense projects, the vessel has suffered from problems such as massive cost overruns and disputes with Russian contractors who are supplying materials for the Indian-built ship.

Former Sears company sues ex-CEO Lampert, Treasury's Steven Mnuchin over 'asset stripping'

Published 04/19/2019 02:05 PM

The company that owned Sears and Kmart has sued its ex-CEO Eddie Lampert and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin over accusations of "asset stripping."

How to Get Rid of Lawn Weeds

Published 04/19/2019 01:30 PM

Unless you stop them, weeds are going to grow in your lawn. Here's what you need to do.

North Korea: US Marine arrested in connection with ‘violent raid’ of embassy in Madrid, sources say

Published 04/20/2019 01:27 PM

A former US Marine who was allegedly involved in a raid of the North Korean embassy in Madrid has been arrested, according to sources familiar with the case.Christopher Ahn was arrested on Thursday in connection with the incident, when a group of at least 10 people stormed into the embassy, restrained and physically beat some personnel and held them hostage for hours in February.Spanish investigators have said the group stole computers and hard drives before fleeing to the United States, where they shared the stolen material with the FBI.US federal agents also reportedly raided the apartment of Adrian Hong, the leader of self-styled human right group Cheollima Civil Defence, this week in relation to the investigation.Cheollima Civil Defence, which is seeking to overthrow North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, has claimed responsibility for the incident but denied that they used violence.Mr Ahn is thought to be the first person arrested in relation to the raid.A Spanish judicial source said the stolen material has been returned to the North Korean embassy, two weeks after the FBI sent it to the Spanish court investigating the raid.The incident came just days before the second summit between Donald Trump and Mr